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living with pain

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RE: living with pain

Posted by sarmi on May 10, 2013 5:43 am

"................And the best way to live with it is is to just allow it to visit when it does, feel it without telling stories about what it means and how long it lasts. But the best thing we can do is craft a life that brings us joy and a sense that we are contributing to the welfare of others. And that is the best treatment in the world for chronic pain. It's inexpensive and there are no side effects."

Dan, you are 110% right. i agree with you. may God bless you.....and all around us.....with our chronic pains!
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Jun 19, 2013 4:07 pm

thank you sharmi,

Most of us over 50 years old have chronic pain and some of us get debilitated by it.
medications only go so far, the rest is up to us.  It is amazing how the body accommodates all sorts of adversity. Go into an assisted living facility and you will see people with arthritis who are in great pain all the time but they will be laughing or engaging in a conversation.

The body is amazing. It's the mind that keeps screwing things up!

My daughters tell me that not only do I have chronic pain, I am a chronic pain! (One I enjoy and one I don't)

www.DrDanGottlieb.com
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RE: living with pain

Posted by gotama on Jul 16, 2013 7:31 pm

why is it my own doctor does not understand i have severe pain that gets worse as time goes by?..seen 2 specialists for arthritice like symptoms in my wrists, elbows and shoulders from being para for 34 years..and they tell me my overuse syndrome is in my head. why do i know whats the cause and they cant even put a name to it..(i came up with my own diagnoses)..im 54 btw
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RE: living with pain

Posted by zuzu on Jul 17, 2013 1:08 am

Because if they put a name to it Wheeler, then they'd have to treat it.  So they say it's in your head and then you have to deal with it and they don't have to figure out how to give you more meds, or physical therapy to help with the pain.  I have fibromyalgia and Interstitial Cystitis.  They are going through lots of name changes for that medical problem, including Irritable Bladder Syndrome (HA!).  One problem I have I've labelled Irritable Skin Disorder because my skin is so sensitive to touch, fabrics, temperature, pressure.  That is nuts, but I have a great uro who treats my IC and the other autoimmune disorders that go along.  Doctors like the people who come in with broken bones that can be set, colds that can be treated, physical forms that can be signed off.  They don't get thrilled dealing with complex and chronic medical situations of people who require time, research and lots of medications that may make them the focus of the FDA.  Keep looking, you will find someone who will help.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Lea_2150734 on Jul 17, 2013 4:48 am

Have you tried a few sessions of Chinese acupuncture to alleviate the pain?  My husband has had good results with it.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Jul 17, 2013 4:48 pm

This thing called life brings us all sorts of pain that we have to endure. There is the obvious physical pain that many of us experience, and then there is the social pain we feel when we feel alone or ostracized. There is psychological pain when there is trauma or acute grief. No surprise but the body/mind experiences all of these different kinds of pain in the same way. And we describe pain as “unbearable” or “intolerable”. But that’s really not accurate. A story…
About 5 years after my sister died, my mother died. And several months after my mother’s death, I was notified by my daughter that my ex wife died of anaphylactic shock. When I went to the cemetery in North Jersey, my daughters were standing graveside with their future husbands/boyfriends crying bitterly. I was off to the side because there is really no good place for an ex spouse to grieve.
As the ceremony continued, all I could do was watch my precious daughter’s sob bitter tears in the arms of men who would be their future. I was in such great pain I felt I could barely breathe. As I was leaving the cemetery to go to my Van, I look to the heavens and said: “I can’t take any more pain, it just can’t.”
And I think I heard a voice back saying: “sure you can Dan, you just don’t want to!” Yeah, I guess that’s what I meant to say. All of you are familiar with the saying “what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger”.
Never a big fan of bumper stickers therapy, but the truth of my divine insight is this: whether we want to or not, most living beings find a way to accommodate pain. An architect once said that in nature there are no straight lines. And so with us living beings, life doesn’t go in straight lines. Look at any tree and see assaults that caused it to bend or grow in a different way.
Like it or not, we accommodate. When my neuropathic pain began I screamed that I could never live with this for the rest of my life. 2 years later I am living with this. Not through any brilliant psychotherapy or divine wisdom, it was just the wisdom of my body getting used to this dis-ease.
Wisdom of the body. Oh how I have grown to honor, respect and listen to that wisdom.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Jul 31, 2013 2:52 pm

At the end of the day yesterday I began to get ready for bed when the pain in my arm hit me with a vengeance.  It felt different from the burning pain I usually feel, this time it felt like ice picks going into my arm repeatedly.  Each time I felt this stabbing pain, my body would get rigid and my head would slam against my head rest.  When it stopped for a moment I would try to catch my breath but it came back again over and over.

I was aware at the time that I was in too much pain to use any of the tools I often preach about.  My body/mind was in crisis and when that happens it's either fight, flight or freeze up.  I did the latter just feeling this ice pick over and over.  And then I was able to take five or six slow breaths before it came again.  And in those few seconds I was able to realize how much I was suffering.  Moreover how much my arm was suffering.  When the pain returned a few seconds later, it still felt like an ice pick but I was near tears for how much my arm and my body were suffering.

Several takeaways from this:
1).  When you are in acute crisis, all you can do is be in crisis because your thinking brain is temporarily off duty.
2).  These tools actually work.  Once I was able to change my perspective, the pain felt the same but I no longer tensed my body or told myself stories were cursed at the gods.  Compassion for my body made everything feel better.
3).  Pain sucks!
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RE: living with pain

Posted by KGN on Aug 1, 2013 7:25 pm

True, true! Those conclusions are very correct. I fully appreciate the fact that somebody feels the same way I do when I am in major pain. Thank you Dr Gottlieb!
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Aug 6, 2013 5:03 pm

my vacation starts tomorrow and last night I found myself packing extra Neurontin and Cymbalta for my pain. And then I realized why I was packing these extra drugs. Of course it's the obvious-if my pain breaks through I want to be able to do something about it.
But there's a more subtle issue here. I was packing those medications because of my fear of pain. I was actually paying homage to my fear.

How many of us suffer with fear of pain and not just the pain itself. Fear of pain can cause as much suffering as the pain. Fear of pain can cause us to forget that we are not in pain this moment. Fear of pain, like all fear is all about the future. And you know what research shows about our ability to predict the future?
We are not as good as we think we are. Actually, we are terrible at it.

It's not easy having a mind. Here we are not having pain and all of a sudden we begin to think about the future and suffer. Silly humans!
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RE: living with pain

Posted by zuzu on Aug 7, 2013 4:07 am

"I was actually paying homage to my fear."  Or were you planning to be well prepared based on extensive knowledge of your body and years of experience?  

You are right about the fear of pain in the future.  It's why I didn't want my hip surgery last year or the butt fix I needed this spring.  But because of you and others here, this years surgery was easier to deal with mentally.  I was more prepared to take the time off from life that was required for healing.  I asked for the doctor to be honest about recovery, he was, and I have been more honest about what my body feels each day.  I've cared for it as if I was it's caregiver.  Thanks to you, Dr. Dan, and others here.  

But when I go on my first real jaunt away from home, I'll go prepared, with pain meds for each of my repaired parts, because I know that I'm not the original model, I'm the fixer-up.  And sometimes the replacement parts are a little cranky and need to be tweaked, and I'm a klutz that doesn't always stay upright.  I like to be prepared.

Hope you have a swell time.  Try to your wheels on the ground.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by KGN on Aug 7, 2013 10:47 am

Dr Gottlieb, you are so right! The fear of having future pain and the fear of suffering is as bad as the pain itself. You hit the nail right on the head! Danny and I both feel that way. Whenever we go out, I always carry extra medicine in case of pain, anxiety, orthostatic hypotension, you name it! I live in fear of pain bc once that pain sets in, I am not a fun person. I have a deep desire to be liked and loved and so then, I don\'t want to be around others when I am really hurting, bc I might be less than cordial, but more curt, with them. I have gone to my room, and cried myself to sleep while waiting for pain/anxiety medication to kick in many times! I suffer from fibromyalgia, a c/6-c/7 fusion, neuropathy, and an inoperable thoracic break (as does Danny). I try and move him as best as I can but he\'s 6\'4\" and 280 lbs, and I\'m 5\'3\" and 145 pounds. I try to always give him the care he deserves, but my pain holds me back from even resting peacefully at night.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by LoriK on Aug 7, 2013 12:40 pm

I am glad to hear about different ways to try and deal with pain. I tolerate my pain until its unbearable and then I take pain pills. I have tried deep breathing and talking to my pain. For me also, the fear of the pain takes away from living a life as full as could be.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by KGN on Aug 17, 2013 7:27 am

Hello! I understand about pain. I am constantly in physical pain and frequently in emotional pain. I am fused at c/6-7, have arthritis, fibromyalgia, and several disc bulges along my neck and spine. I have had radiofrequency nerve abalation twice this year on my neck, and trigger point injections, about a dozen each time, into my neck and back to help with the pain of fibromyalgia. Radiofrequency nerve abalation is, from what I understand, where they insert needles into the nerve centers of my neck and spine, and heat them up until they singe the nerve endings and damage them, so that I supposedly don\'t feel the pain any longer, but I still feel the pain in a big way! I try hot, hot baths, prayer and mild to moderate exercise to help, but is there anything that really stops the pain? Getting up in the mornings is agonizing!
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Aug 21, 2013 11:28 am

many have found things that stop their pain. But in my experience they are in the minority. Most of us have chronic pain and will have it for the rest of our lives. So the question is no longer how do I stop it, the question is how do I live with it?
Once you are willing to ask that question, and willing to open yourself up to the possibility/probability that you will have pain going forward, you will be more open to ways of dealing with chronic pain.
That makes the focus now not necessarily on diminishing pain (although that would be great), the focus is on living with pain in a way that won't compromise the quality of our lives.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Elizabeth_2152231 on Aug 27, 2013 3:21 am

To everyone posting on this topic: I love you! I have been thinking on how I have been wasting the last ten years of my life trying to deny, change and have my situation understood by people who just don't / won't get it. I will be clear up front. I am not paralysed. I am in severe chronic nerve pain. I was hit by a car going abut 70 km/hr May 14th 2004 and the ligaments in my knee were ruptured. I had to diagnose myself online before a doc listened to me and agreed to an MRI in 2010. Last month  ( June 2013) it was concluded my pain is not from the knee but the nerves in my leg. They were squished up from the impact and it is causing "constant" debilitating pain. In quotes because I have read this thread and Dr. Dan and get it now. Ten years later. I found a wonderful family doctor who takes care of me now and am a patient at the chronic pain unit followed by a neurosurgeon. I get nerve blocks every three months, I take neurontin 2100mg, Codiene 78mg , celebrex 400mg , and Effexor 150mg. I just started to realize that my life is never going to get better if I don't learn to live with one good leg I have and let go of the other one. There is nothing they can do with the science of today, so live with it. I don't want to live with it, but I am trying to get through this 5 stages thing my doc told me I needed to do and accept it. I just want to be able to run with my kids. I will never teach them to ride a bike. I was not the one who helped teach them walk. I cannot carry my baby. Pregnancy is a fun ride for nine months to say the least. (I am learning to laugh at the words that come out of "normies" when they are pregnant, but if this is the worse they have experienced, who am I to judge?) I want to do so many activities that just will not happen. Believe me, I have tried to get better. I have done so many exercises thinking I just need some muscle and all would be good. Won't happen. I have muscle atrophy in the bad leg and no matter how hard I try it won't go away. I have tried to just ignore it because I am just a nut job and it isn't true, right? (That is what the docs told me in the beginning) Now I drown in the pain. When I get spikes (I am a constant 5/10 minimum, can get to 10/10 but most days are a 7-8/10 ) I have a hard time calming down, the whole body just goes rigid. I try to stay alone because when other people see it they start to panic "what can I do!" and it just makes it worse because 1. I don't have the breath to answer and 2. No one can do anything, not even me. Their panic makes mine worse. Try explaining that to every person who is in your life over and over... well I assume you guys have. Hence ... again, I love you all!. The family asks me if I took my pills... heck yes! too many to count and it is still there! Then I beat myself up because I waited too damn long the pills aren't doing anything for the pain and I have to sit here and do nothing. I feel like I can't even protect my kids... so fun when your baby learns to walk and notices very quickly mommy can get me. Bed time, bath time, and diaper changes become much more difficult than they already are without being able to pick baby up or kneel next to the bath because you can just collapse from the pain and have already dropped on child before realizing the extent of the damage done.  I can't stop them from running out in traffic. So, I don't go out. I am afraid of them getting hit by a car because I couldn't catch the curious baby who moves so much faster than mommy. Forget baby proofing. If I put it out of babys reach, then it is hell for me to get. I am venting my depression on all of you now. I am sorry. It is just so comforting and therapeutic to hear words that I just don't want to say coming from the key boards of people who have finally learned to say them... It sucks when you have the stomach flu and there is no get up and run to the toilet. I am guessing you guys get that too. I can't say any of this to the people around me. I have tried to explain this to them until I am blue in the face and it is to the point I was told to suck it up by my aunt and mother in law, who until a few days ago, were all I have I had. The rest left a few weeks after the accident. Maybe some lasted a couple of months. But today I have no one from then. I have been made to feel like I am less of a parent because of not being able to do things. That my girls would be better off living else where. I know that. They want to live a lift without pain in the home. but I love them and this is all they know. They have never seen me from before. My oldest is 8. I have to be dependent on others to help me get around. I can't "clean house" like a normal person, so I am hashed on for that too. If I ask something, It comes with a string. I can't go and do my groceries. So I have to barter with not so welcoming people sometimes just to fill the fridge.

This last week I am starting to move on I think. I am working on it. I have a psycologist for my girls, who is finding a food bank that delivers. My doc told me to get over the arogance and get a wheel chair. Gov is helping with the funding for a permanent one, I got my loaner three days ago. The freedom! I took the girls to the park. It was so fun! It was wonderful to see people outside of my house and not be escorted! It is still hard though, because it means that this is it. This is real. That this sucks. and it is big and bulky and hard to push. ... I can go on and on... I don't have to though. I know deep down that this is the best for me and the girls. Doesn't mean I have to like it though. It still sucks. A lot.

I tumbled on this thread from google and I think you are all angels. Every one of you. it is a fight. and you show people who don't want to accept the new reality that it is okay and possible to live with the suffering. I had nightmares for years of drowning because I used to be a competitive swimmer. i can only swim with the one leg now. I only figured that out after the nightmares stopped and I was willing to get back in a pool. hehehe, I look like the older ladies in the slow lane just going for a dip... I get it now... But the worse is when people look at me. since the accident it has always been "but you are so young. Your body should heal well." hell unless you have a big MRI and ultrasounds and know what to look for, you can't even tell that there is anything wrong with my leg besides the fact it is skinnier. It bugs me to have people assume that there has to be scars or something if there is so much damage.

Boy thank you guys. thank you Dr. Dan. starting tonight I am following your suggestions. they seem to be logic based. so logically it is worth the try.  If I am in the wrong place please tell me, but I would love to follow along quietly. You give me hope that it can and will get better.
Than k you again.
Sincerely, Elizabeth
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Aug 29, 2013 11:49 am

Hi Elizabeth,
welcome to the neighborhood! No need to worry about not being paralyze, we don't discriminate! Seriously, we are just a bunch of humans looking for what humans look for-well-being and happiness. Well,, that was some story you told. It sounds like you have been needing to connect with kindred spirits for a very long time, and I'm glad you have.

I mentioned last week that I was recently in South Africa and many of the roads they traveled were not paved. And some of those were pretty rugged terrain. I was traveling with several people including my daughter Debbie who has always been quite protective of me. So there we were in the back of the van with me bouncing around in my wheelchair. This is something that always raises my heart beat, my blood pressure had makes my pain much worse.
I watch my poor daughter in anguish wanting to do something when I reassured her "it's okay honey, it's only pain". I wasn't being a martyr, but I was simply experiencing pain, she
was suffering.

So please take care of that depression of  yours, knowing most of us have been there and many of us still carry the thousand pound gorilla called depression. Remember the best treatment for depression is a combination of medication and psychotherapy. Either one alone is much less effective.

Please take care and keep us posted
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Elizabeth_2152231 on Sep 10, 2013 12:39 am

Thank you.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Sep 11, 2013 9:32 am

my pain has been much worse lately,  so bad  that I even used  a lidocaine patch  the other day.  I rarely use them because they are so painful when  my nurses  apply them and even worse  when they take them off.

I watch my nurses  and my girlfriend as they try to figure out  why it is so bad these days and what we can do about it: "maybe it's the change of seasons, maybe you are working on a urinary tract infection, maybe you are working too hard  and overtired,, maybe  it's…"

And each of these theories has an intervention of medication,  rest, allergy pills or whatever..

Don't get me wrong, I love these people and they love me. Certainly their hearts are in the right place.And When anyone watches someone they care about  suffer, they feel helpless-they suffer also. And what do we do when we feel helpless? We tried to fix something or change something. It's understandable.

But any of us with chronic pain knows that most of the time  it's just not explainable.. It's like a relative we dislike who comes to visit; we don't know when they are coming and once they arrive they are terribly annoying.. Making matters worse, we never quite know  when they are leaving. And while they are there we simply have to  live through it..

I don't know about others who experience chronic pain,, but when  my pain is acting out I feel pain.  But when someone who cares about me watches me in pain,  they suffer.
In a strange way, simply feeling pain  is easier than suffering with  helplessness..
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Wendy205 on Nov 13, 2013 11:55 am

I agree it is better to feel the pain, no matter how bad, than helplessness.  Even worse is when you try to find or do something to make the situation better, especially when nothing can be done to correct the situation, the physical and mental strain and pain may put me over the edge. At times I may not be able to continue with a smile on my face.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Nov 13, 2013 3:45 pm

Wendy,

Last week I saw a woman whose husband died 2 years ago after 20 years of marriage. Still deeply depressed she told me that she wakes up every morning still wishing for him to come back. She said the depression is with her constantly and that ache to have him back has never gone away.

The brain doesn't recognize the difference between physical and emotional pain. After all, anguish is anguish. So when we experience our agony from neuropathic pain or whatever and she experiences hers the brain doesn't discriminate. Same with a caretaker who experiences the pain of helplessness and hopelessness, or someone who lives with a disability and feels anguish because they ache for what they had yesterday.

It's easy to say "simply feel what you feel". But isn't that like asking someone who feels like they're drowning to simply experience the moment? Well, yes and no.

All of our suffering is not about the pain, it's about what we do with the pain. That woman feels agony and there is nothing we can do to change that. Nor should we. But the suffering is when the pain we feel becomes part of our being and we tell ourselves that is all we experience. I have asked people who have neuropathic pain to tell me about their lives and the first thing they say is they have a life of pain. That's what my patient would say – she has a life of heartache.

Not true. Pain is part of our lives. On the worst day of our lives, we will notice child laugh or a squirrel playing outside or become aware that the closing we are wearing feels comfortable. We will notice it but we will not "feel" it. And if that's what happens when the worst day of our lives, imagine what happens on an average day in our lives.

As we speak, I have been in and out of bed for the last 4 days with a virus. And now my only remaining symptom is horrible fatigue. Sometimes when I feel the fatigue, I suffer. I tell myself that it's part of aging, that this is my future, that I will never have my energy back. Then I feel fatigue and I suffer. And sometimes when I feel fatigue, I am grateful for my hoyer lift and my orthopedic pillow! Then I just feel fatigue. Fatigue feels much better than suffering!

Oh the stories we tell ourselves
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Wendy205 on Nov 19, 2013 4:39 pm

I can understand the woman’s heartfelt wish for her husband to come back and depression.  I risked my life (problems recovering from surgery) and donated a kidney to my (brittle diabetic, cancer surviving + other ailment) sister.  Then I was hit and she developed pain in her stomach.  Within a couple years in dealing with that and a leg amputation we lost her to a stomach bleed. 

Thoughts have been diverted from the pain however the pain is relentless.  Do I take the medication to relive the pain which causes other conditions and eventually death to enjoy a better, less painful shorter life, is the question.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Nov 20, 2013 1:36 pm

hi Wendy,
it's nice to hear from you again

Hi Wendy,

You bring up the most critical point of all-life and quality of life versus death.
In your case, it's not black and white. There is a balance. I think it was Hippocrates that said "inside of all healing medicines, there is a little bit of poison."
All of our medications are harmful to our bodies in the long run, some more than others. I struggled with this same question Wendy. And I finally decided the middle road. So I chose some pain and less medication. But the reason I made this choice is not because the medication would shorten my life (longevity, in my opinion, is not all it's cracked up to be anyway!), But the medications made me feel groggy and less sharp in my thinking. No way I was going to live that way!

Quadriplegia, other disabilities, severe chronic pain and other things give us a painful opportunity to ask some of the questions:
"what does it mean to have a life?"
"In the time I have left, what do I want my life to be like?"
"What do I want for my children, spouse, parents and what can I do to help bring happiness to their lives?"

Most people don't get to ask these questions Wendy because they are able to avoid sitting, reflecting and contemplating issues of life and death. But without these big questions, we don't have a compass for our lives.

I would love to know more about you Wendy. Family, children, what your life was like before all of this and what your life is like now. And I want to know these things partly because I am a shrink. Mostly because I care.
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RE: living with pain

Posted by James_2154775 on Nov 23, 2013 3:07 am

Hello Everyone --

This is quite a discussion!!!  Thank you all for sharing your perspectives - I think it helps when we know we are not alone in our pain.  I myself am a T12 paraplegic, with chronic neuropathic pain I've been dealing with since I had my injury about 12 years ago.  I feel very fortunate to have mobility and a decent amount of independence to move around.  I've suffered a lot at night, having problems sleeping ever since the day I was shot in a carjacking incident in South Africa. 

I'm doing a combination of massage, acupuncture and chiropractic treatments that has made an incredible difference for me over the last 4 months or so.  I would say the biggest help has been the acupuncture.  The pain is still there, but it feels as if the energy has been toned down to a lower level; this let's me be more productive around the house and in my web design and copywriting business.  I would recommend trying some adaptive yoga classes, if you can find them.  I was fortunate to be in good shape before my injury - I did yoga for 12 years.  I use a lot of yoga now to manage and work through my pain.  Since doing the acupuncture, I've discovered that when I do a certain yoga position of crossing my legs and leaning forward with my chest down on the bed, I fall asleep - it manages my pain AND my insomnia!  I can't tell you how incredible this breakthrough is, to be able to sleep properly after 12 years of not sleeping!  I know how to work it.  I sleep on my stomach first, and then pain will wake me, but I turn on my side and sleep in that position.  I do my yoga pranayama breathing, and that helps ease my pain and get me back to sleep.  Usually the next time I wake up, the third phase - creates all kinds of pain, discomfort, restlessness, etc.  But now on the third phase I stop and get into the yoga position.  It takes me right into a beautiful dream state.  That is enough to help me feel rested and like I can manage my life. 

I tried numerous techniques, therapists, etc. to experiment to get to this phase.  I worked out with a Pilates therapist, and she got me to be able to get up on all fours and even crawl, which was a huge breakthrough.  Our bodies are not static; they are dynamic and changing.  My feeling about my life is that I can keep working at it and find the combinations of techniques that work for me.  This has been almost a necessity, because my 15 year old son's mother cannot take care of him because of financial problems and other issues.  So I'm thrilled to have my son with me, and at first I was worried that I wouldn't have the energy to deal with him (and it is a little overwhelming at times).  But these new therapies have helped me get the energy I need to manage everything. I think for me, I would say the key is to never stop searching or experimenting and trying new things.  If you can do that, and live in the present moment of just enjoying the beauty of day-today simple things, you can gradually get better.  And part of that is dealing with the emotions surrounding pain, which tend to frustrate us even more.  I meditate three times a day, and it makes all the difference in the world.  I'm amazed that I can be a single father and operate a very small copywriting business.  A year ago, when I was facing a terrible pressure sore ulcer and surgery, I could not imagine how much my life has improved.

I would like to suggest trying Bach Flower Essences, if folks have not experimented with them before.  They have a very subtle effect, and they are the only treatments I found that help help and transform emotions.  I've even used them successfully with my son.  They can help with depression, different types of anxiety, negativity, emotional transitions, lots of things.  I think using the Flower Essences along with meditation is important.

I still have pain, and sometimes after grocery shopping and/or cooking, or a meeting or picking my son up from school, all I can do is zone out on the couch and try to get my bearings.  But overall, I am making real progress, and I expect that I will heal more.  I've also found that dancing in my wheelchair helps keep my body flexible and enhance circulation etc.  I also do well when I dance on the couch, which my bare feet flat on the floor.  I can feel the nerve sensation of gravity, which helps complete neural pathways.  I figure the more neural pathways I can create, the more my pain will go down and other kinds of sensations will increase.  I don't do nearly enough of these dancing and circular movements as I should.  But I think one of the keys for us is to continually look for small things that work for us.  I hope what I've said makes sense and is helpful for others.

Peace,      James
  • Posts: 55
  • Joined: 07/14/10

RE: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on Nov 27, 2013 3:46 pm

hi James,

early on after my accident  and Dr. told me that I would know more about my body and what was needed than any Dr.. I didn't quite believe him  back then, but we all know that is true..  These chronic issues we struggle with whether it is pain,, spasms  or whatever. We have to find what works and use it.

You are not only  creative and inspirational,,  you are  a great teacher..  Yes, acupuncture has been researched extensively  and has a good track record with pain.  So does meditation  and yoga.. Sounds like you and your son  are going to have  a wonderful, loving  and  creative time  together..  Enjoy!
www.DrDanGottlieb.com
  • Posts: 55
  • Joined: 07/14/10

Re: living with pain

Posted by Dan Gottlieb on May 28, 2014 4:11 pm

I dunno, maybe it's the humidity these days on the East Coast, but my pain has been screaming the last couple of days. It's like I have no skin on my arms and shirts are painful. This is problematic because although I would prefer to have no shirt on, it might be a little complicated while seeing patients. Well, actually while they are seeing me! But I digress…

I just returned from the funeral of an 88-year-old man and I looked across the aisle and there was his 25-year-old grandson sobbing. He was in agony.

And yesterday I had a consultation with a 30-year-old woman who just found out she had the breast cancer gene and was considering a double mastectomy. And she was in agony.

We have all experienced excruciating pain whether it is physical or emotional. So what have we learned? And I am asking those of us – all of us who live with pain and are truly living. And I've no doubt that includes everyone reading this post.

I don't want to know about what interventions you've done and what has been effective and what hasn't. Because ultimately our hearts and minds find a way to live with what we have. They always do, they always have and always will.

So please share with all of us what you have learned about living with pain and what you feel you still need to learn. Your experience could help so many…
www.DrDanGottlieb.com
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